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20130313
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taxes and all the things that reflect what conservatism was and presumably ought to be but that isn't enough now. jack said today in reaction to lugar's defeated if we continue to move towards purity we will move to your relevance and along the way the country in effect is going to go down the tubes. that i think is a clarion call and you get the clarion call coming from people liked chuck hagel and the lugar and jack danforth not just from us that all to shake people about where we are and where we are going. and what we would hope has happened is with a degree of penetration that still put us from the "washington post" piece before the book is that all that credibility that we have built up would get out there and designate with people but this isn't just a couple people coming from one end of the spectrum saying it is all the fault of the people of the other end and this isn't 100% default of one party. there is plenty of blame to go around but this is the case of the system that's grown in this function as one party and has become an insurgent out lawyer. it means not to disappe
on the same critical topics today. what are the fundamental issues? must begin with tax. we know ronald reagan spent much of his life trying to cut for the average american. he was convinced it is the man or woman on the street didn't understand their dollar more wisely than the federal government. when governor jeb bush was in office, he cut taxes some floridians $20 billion. let's talk about the size of government. when matt mccomas in the wake has house come he to medically reduce the rate of federal spending and strove to reduce the size of the federal government. governor bush was in office, he vetoed more than $2.3 billion in earmarks for higher state spending and reduce the size of the state's government payroll by 13,000 people. when ronald reagan cut taxes and reduce size of the national level, he did it to spread the free market, create opportunity and provide incentives for businesses to grow. over 20 million new jobs were created. and governor bush's state of florida, the similar philosophy and economic programs create a thriving city economy were 1.4 million net jobs were added du
are the fundamental issues? we know ronald reagan spent much of his life trying to cut taxes for the average american. he was convinced that it was the man or woman on the street who knew how to spend their dollar more wisely than the federal government and he did all in his power to prove it by cutting taxes. governor jeb bush was in office he cut taxes on floridians by $20 billion. let's talk abut the size of government. ronald reagan was in the white house he dramatically reduce the rate of growth in federal spending and strove to reduce the size of the federal government. when governor bush was in office, he vetoed more than $2.3 billion in earmarks for higher state spending and reduce the size of the state government payroll a 13,000. when ronald reagan cut taxes and reduce the side of the government on the national level he did it with a purpose in mind. it was to spur the free market, create opportunity and provide incentives for businesses to grow. in his years in office over 20 million new jobs were created governor bush's state of florida is similar philosophy and economic or grams created
't know what to do with fat to get paid taxes, fall also walls but they are not able to take part in the things of the alexandria citizen was about to take part in. this is part of a program that the young local attorney had been working on for some time. >> he was a native of alexandria? wanting to be a lawyer for two reasons, one, there was a lawyer you're in town, thomas watson, who rented space from his father, and he became fascinated with what the lawyer did. the letter he took a trip on with his brother to d.c. and they were coming back and ask to move from the seats once the streetcar brought in alexandria by a patient that was there and they refused to that i believe there was tucker's brother all those that refuse to move from his seat and when they got off the street cars the woman filed that and so i sat down a policeman to have the young, old and a rusted and luckily the charge was confirmed out because the boys were really scared the charges would not be thrown out, but the judge felt like they hadn't created in the disturbance and they were not trying to do anything
was taxing the colonists. and do you remember taxation without representation, so you can trace the beginnings of the revolution to this room. this is the way it would have been when george washington came here for dipper with he and -- dinner when he and martha and the family would come. he not only dined here, but he also dined at various taverns, so let's go over and see gadsby's tavern which was probably george washington's favorite tavern. [background sounds] >> this is gadsby's tavern, probably george washington's favorite t.a.r.p.. he dined her frequently. there was a tavern on this site as early as the early 1770s. in the current building where the museum is today, it was build circa 1785, and the new addition on the corner was added in 1792, so the new addition is over 200 years old too. some of the famous people who dined here included john adams, thomas jefferson, james madison and james monroe. thomas jefferson had his inaugural dinner here. john gadsby had a terrific reputation for hospitality. he was known for the really great dinners that he would serve, so he was
how difficult childbearing is so. tax cuts work. >> e-mails finance, i am encouraged by the feminists. among millenniums, young women. i think there really haven't, all of them. one of the things that i found interesting is a woman quite well known now, co-president of the company. she started out at 22 joining the only black own investment firm in the country. she was to identify right away by the president as being a woman of great talent and promise. when she was 24 he took her to meet one of the biggest sea as in the country. he said, grinning you to be president. and she elected to be his press upper. she jumped whenever he spoke, did everything that heat could including writing thank-you notes to the parents of his children sleepovers. and then at 28 in it president. and she was completely reoriented right up her mid-30s. submission which around and said, gee, it might be nice to have a day once in awhile or meat man. she went with somebody fairly prominent, the filmmaker star wars. they're now engaged. she is 43. she probably will never have children because she really did have
that means people's incomes went down and when their incomes went down that means how much they paid in taxes went down to the deficits automatically got bigger and on top of that we did run a stimulus program to counteract the magnitude of the financial crash created by wall street. so that is why we have a big deficit. now, the point though is that even with the big deficit, we do not have a fiscal crisis today. we do not have anything close to a fiscal crisis and i will give you a statistic that i hope conveys that i will explain why. we hear over and over and over again that we we are in this desperate situation. the amount that the government actually spends on covering its debts its interest payments today is actually had a historic low, not at a historic high. i know people find that hard to believe but it's it's true. again strictly from government statistics. today or in the last year the government paid 7.7% of its overall budget on interest payments. under ronald reagan, the great conservative icon and his successor george bush the first, the government was paying 17.2% total expen
pay taxes, follow the laws, but were not allowed to take part in the things every alexandria citizen had time to take part in. a young attorney named samuel tucker had been working on for some time. >> samuel tucker was a native alexandria. wanted to be a lawyer for two reasons. it is a in town who rented space from tucker's father and became fascinated with what lawyer watson did. the other took a trip on a street car with his brother and to d.c. and they were coming back from d.c. and they were asked to move once the train can't alexandria. they refused. tucker's brother either refuse to move. when i got off the streetcar he looked up and fly down a police man and had the young man arrested. likely the charges were thrown out because the boys are scared charge is it not be thrown out, but the judge that they haven't created any disturbance of the train to do anything illegal, but it gives a sense being a lawyer j.d. power to make things right. >> report at 1939 kitty sargent named george wilson who worked to come into the library and apply for a card. wilson had been denied on tech
a book, said that a separate table and a library staff just not know what to do with that. they pay taxes, filed laws, but there were not allowed to take part in the things that every alexandria system was allowed to take part in. this was part of a program that young local attorneys and samuel tucker had been working on for some time. >> and native from alexandria. two reasons, the lawyer here in town who rented space from tech is father. he became fascinated. and then the other was to take a trip on a street car with his brothers into d.c. there were coming back from d.c. there were asked to move from their seats was the streetcar got into alexandria by white pitcher knew was there. there refused. refuse to move from his seat. when they got up there, got off the streetcar the woman saw and flag down a policeman and had the young man arrested. and luckily there were thrown out because the lawyers were really scared the charges would not be thrown out, but the judge had not created any disturbance and they weren't trying to do anything that was illegal, but it gave tucker a sense that bei
to the as this government because they said, well, the fund company collect long-distance toll taxes. so it's a 10% tax and every long distance call. so if we teach people to make free phone calls you're depriving the government of the money that it needs to send people off to fight and die in vietnam. so they had all these different groups that want to use this technology. but the one that i really focus on and touched on in the book, but the one that this book turns up to secretly be about is the curiosity, the curious teenager's. my book is about people being playful, being curious about asking questions like what happens if i do this? if i can hear these towns, what if the machines in your me? what happens if i doubt this number is on the phone but? the team that just permeates my book. and i would like to share with you to stories. one of them is about a blind kid who was -- well to not let me just read about show. dahlia the phone and leave alone joe was about four years ago when his mother for a shot to death president. it was a shot he would hear again and again is to grow. his mother could be
't do cannot saying we should have a draft or that we need to raise taxes or when you have a national service requirement. that's not for me to say, but it's not sustainable for us to keep doing this. and keep sending these people to fight these wars, and the average american knows the names of more kardashians than medal of honor winners recipients. the names kia. so i think what this book did, for me, it was a way for me to confront this and myself, and a way for me to try to do one small part to try to correct this so that people would know the names of those who have served there, including those who made it back. because theirs is just as important. they are in many ways the walking wounded, and in that way it's been incredibly rewarding that people will have read "the outpost" and for the most part, liked it, enjoyed it is not the right word, but found it meaningful. and what i always say is, and this is not mocking -- this is not, it's not the poetry of some of the great war books of our time by hemingway or dispatchers or things they to do it to reporters but that i tried to w
distance toll taxes, so it's a 10% tax on every long distance call, so if we teach people to make free phone call, we're dei have pry -- depriving the government of money to send people off to die in vietnam. so all these different groups that wanted to use this technology. but the one that i really focus on -- i touch on all of these in the book, but the one it turns out to be about is curiosity, about the curious teenagerrings. my book is about people being playful, about being curious, about asking questions like, you know, what happens if i do this? if i can hear these tone, what if the machines can hear me? what happens if i dial this number that's not in the phone wook? what if just permeates my book. and i'd like to share two stories on this theme. one of them is about a blind kid named joan who was -- well, instead of introducing him, let me just read about joe. hang up the phone and leave it alone. joe was about 4 years old when his mother first shouted that phrase at him. it was a shout he would hear again and again as he grew up. his mother could be forgiven for raising her
that was how to pay for the war. but they suggested ways taxing the columnists. remember taxation without representation. and now the room is set up for dinner and it would have been when george washington came for dinner, when he and the other demo maintained here, but also various taverns around town. so let's go over and see gadsby's tavern, which is george washington favorite tavern. >> probably george washington's favorite tavern. i miss episodes in the early teens centuries and within the cms today was built circa 1785 and a new addition was added 1782. but the new edition is over 200 years, too. other famous people who died here, including john adams, thomas jefferson, james madison. thomas jefferson had his dinner here. john cassidy had a terrific reputation for hospitality. he was no for the really great dinners he would serve. so use well-known all over the area and that's why the president of the united days to come here because it was probably the best place to eat in this entire area. the last year to establish restaurant in baltimore and washington city. when you think about
, sketches and diagrams. others contain these careful records as well as tax rising insights into randel's personal life between 1808 and 1823 because he drafted letters, copied contracts, mentioned family and friends and recorded travels for work and pleasure and my favorite part, recipes. randel's field books are -- [inaudible] of visiting and revisiting, recording, checking, correcting, certifying. it is not unusual for one book to have contained industries from as many as four years. irregularities unsettled randel. every field book attests to his precision and pursuit of perfection in his, his expenses, his schedules. even a rumination offered a window into randel's exact tuesday and his sense of humor. and i typed this out for you pause it's a long passage. -- because it's a long passage. fearing he will not have time to get it requests the lope of my horse and saddle -- the loan of my horse and sad saddle. he is going and returning 65 minutes and 32 minutes in getting and putting up the horse. the whole distance he could have walked in 43 minutes. [laughter] he is, therefore, 44 m
the union? he said, well, they take about as much of my paycheck as taken out in taxes. that's how he saw it. i said, well, why don't you find another job? he said, if i could, i would. so there's obviously concern, these dues that are flowing from these low-paying workers and mid-level workers to very well-paid presidents of unions, and these are all available online, the data, how much the union bosses work from the lm2 forms. >> yeah. i'd also add right to work is a great policy. we strongly supported it at heritage. beyond right to work, i mean, sort of beyond the obvious i think that you have some very good suggestions there. there's a number of states where unions have exemptions from antistalking laws. so pennsylvania, a number of other states, special exemption from anti-stalking laws just for unions. and that allows the unions to put a lot of pressure not just on employers like dave, but on individual employees. and i think those exemptions ought to be removed. there's also a lot of exemptions from the anti-extortion laws for unions. so there's another rico violation being prosecute
or workers should have the right to unionize. we should have a progressive income tax. or maybe the government should take some responsibility for protecting consumers against dangers medical products and medicine and unhealthy food and unsafe and unhealthy workplaces. if i said that maybe we should have a law protecting people from being harassed if they are gay or lesbian. if i said that we should have some kind of national health insurance, if i said that what we need in this country is an end to lynching and the right for african-americans to have the right to vote, all of those things and many more you think i was a utopian. you would think i was maybe somewhat crazy. i was unrealistic, i was impractical or maybe i was even a bolshevik or communist or socialist. and everything i just said is now taken for granted, things that our society accepts as normal. so one of the themes of my book is that the radical ideas of one generation are often the common sense of the next or subsequent generation. and the book is really about the 100 americans who made that happen. so people w
of it, when i talk about other feminist taxes, students premise but they say by saying i am by no means a feminist and then they say something incredibly feminist. i wonder if you think there's a stigma for having the word feminist and what we can do to fix that. >> i said maybe we shouldn't fixate. most recently they don't consider themselves a feminist. as one of my colleagues wrote argued, maybe the fact to consider themselves a feminist means the term is no longer useful. she obviously believes many things we think of them students who believe the feminist things. so should we keep trying to make people aware a big sign or should we just be the fact that we may not see this bird is a sign of the success of the movement. is a tremendous success of the women on most marches? is a sign of succeeding that we don't need that word anymore and these ideas are so assimilated in two rdna that we may not need it anymore. >> i think what color sells women's advocates. say much more neutral term. feminists became a dirty word among gen x. obviously among your students we do have to get away fro
library for all african-american patrons who are citizens of alexandria, who pay taxes and have a right to use that facility. they saw tucker on the street in alexandria, they say that they saw a man with his briefcase and a slightly rumpled suit, but he had a very determined walk, and he was always headed somewhere, and he always wanted to make things right for other people. e understood the injustice that was out there. he understood that african-americans had so much, a so much harder time than the white community to get a free trial or to get access to a free trial. and he wasn't successful all the time, but he tried, and he fought against the prevailing view. and i think that was one of the most important things about him. >> go to c-span.org/localcontent. >> you're watching booktv on c-span2. here's our prime time lineup for tonight. up next, alec foege presents "the tinkerers: the amateur, do it yourselves and ip eventer who is make america great." and then at 9 on "after words," kim goddess examines hillary clinton's role in u.s. diplomacy abroad followed by jeffrey frank whose
institutions should suggest that they oppose the administration on some issue whether it's a tax issue or it's a trade issue or something else, there will be a discreet warning from the fed that, well, you know, maybe you could tone that down a bit. we really don't have to have this kind of controversy, do we? that kind of message to the ceo, um, is the very essence of crony capitalism and will be made possible by the fed's control over all these other large institutions just as it has that kind of control right now over thebacking industry -- the banking industry. i don't want to take too much time here. i really am doubtful that the ola could be used, the orderly liquidation authority, could be used effectively to wind down citi. as soon as the fdic makes moves towards citi, everyone would run from citi, and the institution would become a shell. so, um, i think it's quite doubtful that the ola works. my own view is that we really have to beef up the bankruptcy law in order to deal with failing financial institutions. and in terms of wayne, if i can respond to some of the thing wayne said,
of the income tax and so one and even though nixon backed away from it, it was a certain standard set about the welfare system in the country that you have to give maximum credit for. the philadelphia hiring plan and others so she was a pretty good domestic president. i talked to a guy named paul musgrave who said in the first three or four months of the presidency it was like a golden age if you go back and look at it again it's amazing. all the stuff is going on, new policies and ideas, and the public pieces, john osborn wrote for the watch and said the domestic policy meetings they sit around for hours laughing it and there on a whole different side of mixing. then it all stopped. he stopped. he lost interest. >> that is what makes him such a puzzle. >> i'm not suggesting that you are doing this but i was watching on c-span some clips from nixon's state of the union address. again, i am not suggesting this is a way of becoming healthy, but i did it. and i noticed him talking again and again about the environment. and how proud she was of his achievement in cleaning up the aerts and of th
Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)